Tips for unproblematic modes in mastering the dictionary

ANSWERING THE QUESTIONS — 1. How to enrich yourself with vocabulary in just such the exact and particular way that you would be sufficiently pre-armed with it anytime you are engaged to write or speak without having to trouble yourself at present with a lot of vocabulary studies that make you problematic? 2. How to drill yourself on the dictionary in a method apt only for your personal circumstance?

WELL-DISCUSSED IN THE SECOND EDITION OF THE BOOK “HOW DO YOU SAY IT IN ENGLISH” AWAITING TO BE PUBLISHED. THIS FORUM IS OPEN FOR INTERACTION WITH THE READERS.

 

 

 

 

 

1. Some techniques for improving one’s vocabulary. How to get, by oneself, the exact equivalent of phrasal terms especially when not available from the dictionary. (Excerpt from Chapter 7 of “How do you say it in English?”, First Edition.)

 

What to study first

Study the grammar well. This consideration is foremost.

What to read next

Read the dictionary, thesaurus, and lexicon regularly. Try to understand and memorize certain words at a given time.

Should you rely on the first two?

But do not rely totally on the two procedures given above, especially on the second because the typical dictionary and other similar wordlists usually do not offer meanings in phrasal form for Filipino-to-English or English-to-Filipino translation.

What to make as a habit

Make the habit of reading English reading materials. As you capture an unfamiliar term while reading, pause for a while, underline, then ponder over, and paraphrase it. By paraphrasing, we mean that you take an educated guess at its possible Filipino equivalents highlighted in your mind.    Pick out your nearest interpretation. It could turn out to be the right one. Let it temporarily dwell in your mind.

Keep going

Read more pieces of stuff. Keep doing the same method. As you go on, you certainly will encounter the same term that you had tinkered with in your previous readings. Through the process, you will find that your nearest guess of its equivalent or translation proves to be the exact one; or you will realize that you had your guessed-out translation “barely” mistaken, but then, finally, will meet the precise one. By going over the same term that you had previously picked out from one material, written in a new or different site this time, you gradually figure out the correct sense and meaning in which it should be conveyed.

Now let’s have this try

Keep doing this method in listening to a conversation, movie dialogues, speeches, etc.

 

Example:

 

Let us now presume that in your reading you have met this phrase in a sentence:

A word is there that the mayor is coming to town.

In this sentence, you wonder what the term a word is there means in Filipino.

So this time, have a few bits of rephrasing, like for example:

Isang salita ang naroon na ang alkalde ay darating sa bayan. (direct translation)

Surely, the above straight conversion would sound a “junk” to you, so that you would try for another:

May    salita    doon    na    ang    alkalde    ay darating sa bayan.

 

And because this appears still graceless, you proceed with some more or less educated or logical guess. This means you should make a restating that would not seem awkward but may usually be expressed in everyday articulation with everyone’s acceptance; one that does not sound strange or bumbling to our way—the Filipino way.

 

Hence, with an acceptable logical reconsideration, this rewording proves to be the definite rendition:

 

May usap-usapan (doon) na ang alkalde ay darating sa bayan. [You may omit doon.]

 

There you get it!

Next medium to use

Keep on reading some more materials or listening to such other mediums. Some other time, you will meet the term a word is there once again. By the setting in which the term will be used in your next reading, you will figure out what it should mean. As repeatedly as you would encounter it, it will start to dwell in your mind with its exact meaning.

Another try

Another example:

 

The magazine has it that Filipinos are the world’s busiest texters.

1st direct possible translation but to be rejected —

Ang magasin ay mayroon nito na ang mga Pilipino ang pinakaabalang nagtitekst sa mundo.

2nd direct possible translation but to be rejected —

Mayroon ang magasin na ang mga Pilipino ang pinakaabalang nagtitekst sa mundo.

Nearer logical translation —

May sinasabi ang magasin na ang mga Pilipino ang pinakaabalang nagtitekst sa mundo.

Short, exact translation —

Sabi sa magasin ang mga Pilipino ang pinakaabalang  nagtitekst sa mundo. 

 

Now take the reverse, seeing the Filipino specimen . . . to the English version. There you go one good step, just how you should say it in English.

Finally, what’s more?

Read comic strips in English. Watch English movies with on-screen dialogue. Do as those above.

 

And, of course, do read my book. Let’s, this once, share one good time learning English!

 

 

 

2. NOTE: BITIN PO ANG SECOND PART NA ITO. KASI KAILANGAN NINYONG HINTAYING LUMABAS ANG AMING NEXT EDITION BOOK. Nevertheless, ang discussion sa baba ay patikim o introductory knowledge. It’s not that heavy and in-depth dictionary learning; just simple learning; just Quotidian Learning! (Excerpt from the second edition)

 

Distilling the Quotidian

The answer to the challenge posed at the opening of this chapter as well as to the questions asked therein is, the method of Distilling the Quotidian.

 

I use distilling instead of the other words condensing, abridging, concentrating etc. because all these other words SIMPLY mean reducing or compacting; and so are quite deficient for the present idea I would like to convey. Distilling is not simply reducing or compacting. It is taking the most important parts of something and putting them in a different and usually improved form (Merriam-Webster Dictionary); or extracting the essence of (Wiktionary).

 

Please keep in mind that our norm in this paradigm study of the English translation is not simply simplifying, narrowing down, and shortening the learning process as well as the study issues but extracting the most important ones for the purpose of improving them.

 

But first, let us find out the reasons why we have to do distilling. In effect, we are going to realize the reasons why most of us have poor English vocabularies, do not know the English equivalents of our Filipino specimens, and can hardly say it in English:

Inclined to believe that dictionary memorizing is best, which is not

Psychologically, most of us are inclined to BELIEVE that mastering of the dictionary is the best method to improve one’s vocabulary in order to learn English translations efficiently. Trouble is, doing so is a terrible or intimidating task. In fact, we get afraid to do so because the number of words contained in dictionaries seem to be giant piles of mind-eating bugs; we think that we just might get insane committing them to memory as well as mastering them.

It would send us into a cramming situation having to learn grammar and translation patterns, do other studies, do other chores etc., etc. and worst, be yet obliged to master dictionaries. We don’t have sufficient time. Time, therefore, is another mind-eating constraint.

It just makes one’s mind problematic

Because of the two troubles just said, our minds are rendered pre-complicated, problematic, tossed and spread out, and flown apart into a monstrous mass of study concerns that transforms into a dilemma. In such a case, we don’t know how and where to begin. And we are afraid how we are going to end up. E hindi kaya ng sitwasyon natin at oras natin. Ang dami pa nating ibang iniisip at inaasikaso.

 

For such reasons, what needs to be our foremost concern now is to have an antidote for that frightening belief to which we are inclined. Since when there is fright in learning, there is poor learning. Hence, we have to mellow or calm down our mindset. But now, I declare that the only way to antidote that belief is not to believe that belief. And the only way to not believe is to get ourselves self-assured that such a notion or belief is wrong: That such task, effort or attempt of a wide-ranging or wide-embracing dictionary mastering is not the very action required in our vocabulary learning process. My formula therefore for the efficient vocabulary mastering is the a) Mellowing Approach b) the Process of Discarding and the c) Method of Distilling. Actually they do not mean to be done sequentially; instead, doing of one is doing the others—concurrent. As to the reason why will be answered below.

 

Now, having realized the above-mentioned factors, let us know what we should discard or not bother:
We are not going to be specialists as to oblige ourselves to master those scientific words, technological words, biological words, surgical words and other terms of very special use for special fields. We don’t need them for the time being, unless we are taking up a specialized profession requiring a task of mastering them. Instead, for purposes of effective day-to-day communication, our only needed words are the quotidian words (discussion below).
We are not aspiring to be scrabble champions so we don’t need to master rarely used and odd words.

 

Hence, we really have the need to apply the Process of Discarding. It is so since to be able to distill, of course, we have to discard. In this process of discarding accompanying the process of distilling, we are in effect mellowing or stabilizing our frame of mind, freeing it of complications and head-scratchers. In short, one best way to learn is to unlearn.

Just learn the Quotidian way

Let me reiterate that the measure in the process of distilling is getting one’s learning complexion composed or relaxed, then confident. It is possible by realizing what one should not know and forgetting what one is not obliged to do. The technique is to pay attention only to what is applicable to and necessary in one’s personal learning circumstances.

 

The readers should understand this learning norm being introduced by the style of this book. In this learning norm, specialized words are not our staple models because our primary concern in our process of learning “how to say it in English” is for purposes only of being able to be confident in day to day speech and conversation. Therefore, we should only bother studying Quotidian words or Workaday Words instead of Specialized Words.

 

Quotidian/Workaday Words are those that are everyday ones; needed just enough to be able to communicate satisfactorily well; to go at ease in everyday dealings and communications; to catch up with this fast-paced age of communication; and to keep abreast with this age of competitiveness where proficiency in English makes the big difference; but definitely not to be scrabble experts or even vocabulary geniuses. Instead, just, just, just those needed enough; no more no less.

 

Let’s have these full definitions: quotidian — occurring every day; belonging to each day, every day; commonplace, ordinary. Workaday — of, relating to, or suited for working days; ordinary, prosaic. (Merriam-Webster Dictionary)

 

Merriam-Webster’s examples:

Not content with the quotidian quarrels that other couples had, they had rows that shook the entire neighborhood. — Hindi kuntento sa araw-araw na away na tulad ng sa ibang mag-asawa, nagkaroon sila ng matinding away na sumindak sa buong kapitbahayan.

Just a workaday guy living a workaday life. — Ordinaryong tao lang na nabubuhay ng ordinaryong buhay.

Wished that she could afford servants so as not to be bothered with such workaday matters as cooking, cleaning, and grocery shopping. — Sana’y makaya niyang gumugol para sa mga katulong nang sa ganoon ay hindi siya maabala ng mga karaniwang/pang-araw-araw na bagay tulad ng pagluluto, paglilinis, at pamimili ng mga groceries.

We are not supposed to be bothering ourselves on these

In other words, we are not supposed to be learning such high words as equivalueing, copacetic, peroneal, guacamole, fodient, troak, veretrate, fore–and-aft, wulfenite, cuinage, dualin, etc. We don’t need them. We will instead abandon them because they are simply nuisance (abala) to our learning process. Saka na ang mga iyan kapag master na muna natin ang QUOTIDIAN ENGLISH VOCABULARY. When I say quotidian or workaday, again they are those that involve only the ones needed for us to be able to communicate well in typical situations and not in extraordinary situations. Typical situations are those like in day-to-day dealings, reciting in schools, making correspondence, performing jobs, hunting and applying for jobs, facing interviews, dealing in business, watching and understanding news, watching and understanding movies, and the like. Extraordinary situations are those like taking up bar examination, joining a national and international scrabble tournament, taking up highly specialized courses, speaking to an audience of expert professionals, discussing with world leaders, and the like.

Where can we find a material for quotidian learning with ready quotidian samples?

But your next question would be: “Where can we find finished materials of distilled quotidian vocabularies and wordlists attuned to our individual settings?” (As expected, for anyone who conforms to my learning style to be able to learn to say it in English proficiently, he needs a compendium of such quotidian study issues that this book emphasizes.) I now suppose you expect me to be doing the task right away for you. Yes naman! Actually, such is the learning norm that the book series has already been engaging on. In fact, in the succeeding editions of the series, I will come up with some more such finished products. Still, in fact, the concept and style of my work embodied in all these books series including the first edition are classical of distilled quotidian format. Hence, to emphasize, my book style is actually a Distillation style. Problem is, as my series go out in the market, it would involve more budgets for some of you learners who could be average earners in order to be able to purchase your own copies. May kamahalan sa iba. Mag-iipon pa. Now kung tutuusin nga, you don’t have to purchase my finished products in the meantime that you cannot yet afford. Because you can do my method on your own; though it will be better if you do have, as copies of mine come out in bookstores.

 

(FOR YOUR FULL-LENGTH LEARNING, PURCHASE YOUR COPY OF “HOW DO YOU SAY IT IN ENGLISH?, NOSEBLEEDERS’ EDITION” AS SOON AS IT COMES OUT IN THE MARKET.)

 

Verbs and prepositions with special functions that are solution to translating problem

In relation to Pinoys’ English learning orientation, there are English words having extra functions that are disregarded by them because of the fact that the typical Pinoys’ learning culture in the study of English is to teach and be taught only of the basic and usual usages of these words, that is, confined to usually only one-two major usages. Now, the Filipino learners of translation should be enlightened and reoriented to realize that they have to be not too basic. Kaya madalas napapanganga tayo pag-translate kasi nandiyan lang pala sa extra functions na iyan ang sikreto na di natin na-realized noon.

PATIKIM OR KICKSTART IN THIS FORUM BUT TREATED AND SAMPLED AT LENGTH IN THE FIRST EDITION BOOK “HOW DO YOU SAY IT IN ENGLISH?, 2010 EDITION, ENHANCED” AND THE SECOND EDITION YET TO BE PUBLISHED.

 

Chapter 3, 2nd Edition

SPECIAL VERBS AND PREPS: Quotidian for native English users but non-quotidian for Pinoys

There are English verbs having extra usages aside from what most novice Pinoys ordinarily or typically know. Learning these usages will activate their learning orientation towards discovering translations for those specimens that seem hard to translate but whose conversion to English are actually just dangling at the tip of their tongues, ready to be articulated but are suspended because of their unfamiliarity and unmindfulness of these usages. The topics regarding these were already treated in the first edition. But the full-length discussions, as well as full samplings, were suspended and broken off in that edition by this author until this present edition and the rest of the series. The reason was in order not to make that first book very thick. It was enough that in there the author has triggered the readers’ consciousness; also it was enough that in the meantime in that edition, the basic concepts, techniques, and models or paradigms for translation compatible with the present topics have been generated. Anyway, these present discussions are the full-length treatments with full samplings for certain selected topic/s like in this chapter. These topics, with corresponding samplings, are selected by the author from what he evaluated as all the relevant ones applicable to the Pinoys’ setting, concern, problem, and issue on English learning for which the subsequent treatments/discussions are the solutions. (Purchase the first edition book ‘How do you say it in English?’ from National Book Store.)

Click each tab in each box below

 

 

 

 

To give, offer

Isang kapurihan ang unang sumaksi/makasaksi sa isang dakilang pagtatagumpay. — It’s a pride to bear the first witness to a noble conquest.

 

To give birth to; to produce

Kaya iniutos ng Panginoon na ang bawat isa ay magbunga ng mabubuting gawa. — Thus commands the Lord that everyone should bear the fruit of good works.

 

To be suitable for

Ang biro ay hindi pang-paulit-ulit. — The joke does not bear repetition.

 

To interrupt the continuity of

Nakakahiyang pumasok at magambala/gambalain ang inyong katahimikan. — It’s embarrassing to go in and break your silence.

 

To suppress, bring to an end

Bakit sinawata/pinigil ng ibang unyon ang welga? — Why did the other union break the strike?

 

To announce (startling or bad news)

Hayaan ninyo akong ipahayag itong mahalagang abiso: ang A-club ay hindi sisipot. — Let me break this important notice: The A-club will not show up.

 

To disintegrate under pressure

Bumagsak ang kalusugan niya sa presyon. — His health broke under the strain.

 

 

 

To come to an end

Kapag ang tagtuyot ay matapos sa wakas, bibili tayo ng isang trak ng mga binhi. — If the drought finally breaks, we will purchase a truckload of seedlings.

 

(of the voice) To break with emotion

Humagulhol siya matapos malaman ang balita na ang sikat na diva na si Sheerna Estrada ay seryosong naaksidente. — She broke having learned of the news that the famous diva Sheerna Estrada met a serious accident.

 

 

 

 

 

Nagkasabit-sabit siya sa palumpong sa pagtakas niya. — He got caught in the bush as he fled.

To persuade

Hindi ko mapatanong ang sarili ko./Hindi ko magawa ang sarili ko na magtanong. — I can’t bring myself to ask.

 

Subukan mong mapatanggap siya. — Try to bring him to accept.

 

To cause to come

Nagpangiti ito sa kaniyang mukha. — It brought a smile to her face.

 

To fetch (a price)

Bakit hindi mo na lang i-600 iyan para marami ang bumili. — Why don’t you rather bring that to 600 so many would purchase.

Ibenta mo ito sa halagang 100 para hindi ka lugi. — Bring it to 100 so you will not be losing.

 

To be willing, have the wish

Paniniwalaan mo kaya ang bawat internet blogs?/Maniniwala ka kaya sa bawat internet blogs? — Would you care to believe in every internet blogs?

 

 

Isukat mo kaya ito, gayong nalaman mo na ngayon na isinuot ito noon ng taong may malubha at nakakahawang sakit sa balat? — Would you care to try it on, as you have learned now that it was once worn by somebody with a serious and contagious skin disease?

 

To cause to be directed on or against

Ang paliwanag niya ang nagbigay/nagdulot/naghatid liwanag sa problema. — It was his explanation that cast light on the problem.

Natutunugan ko na pinagsususpetsahan mo ako./Natutunugan ko na pinagbubuntunan/pinagtutuunan mo ako ng suspetsa. — I can sense that you are casting suspicion on me.

 

To direct, usually quickly

Naobserbahan ko siyang sumusulyap sa iyo. — I observed him casting a glance on you.

 

To hit or strike

Nahagip ng bato ang pisngi niya. — The stone caught him on the face.

 

To be in time for

Ow salamat! Nahabol/natiyempuhan ko ang tren! — Thank goodness! I caught the train.

 

To make brief contact with

Subukan mong makaugnayan/makadaupang-palad siya ng kahit isang minuto bago ang pagtitipon. — Try to catch him for even a minute before the meeting.

 

To burst into

Nag-apoy bigla ang kahon. — The box suddenly caught fire.

 

To obtain briefly

Kumuha ka ng bahagyang sulyap. — Catch a slight glimpse.

 

To contract an illness

Ang pagdapo ng/pagkahawa sa sipon ay posibleng-posible kapag nasa umpukan ka. — Catching cold is highly likely when you are in the crowd.

 

To be infected with

Ang sigasig ng samahan ninyo ay nakakahawang tunay sa iba. — The enthusiasm of your organization indeed catches others.

 

To hear

Nakuha/Nasundan/Narinig ba ninyo ang pangalan niya? — Did you catch his name?

 

 

 

Naririnig (nasusundan) ba ninyo ang pagdidikta ko? — Can you catch my dictation?

To attract (attention) or the attention of

Nahahalina mo ang mata ng mga kalalakihan dahil sa iyong katikasan. — You are catching the men’s eyes with your stylishness.

 

 

 

To be entangled

Sumabit ang kapote niya sa kawad. — Her coat caught on the wire.

 

 

 

 

 

Nagkasabit-sabit siya sa palumpong sa pagtakas niya. — He got caught in the bush as he fled.

(of breath) To stop momentarily as a result of surprise etc.

Papagkamalying-tao mo si Kerdel! Nangangapos ang kaniyang hininga. — Go resuscitate Kerdel! He is catching his breath.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sumisinghap ang mga mananakbo sa katatapos pa lang na karera. — The runners are catching a breath from the just concluded race.

This site is newly constructed. More contents are coming up.

 

Much-needed patterns in translation, discussed at random

There are patterns in translations that this book needs no longer treat for heavy discussion; instead, they are sampled in this chapter at random. They are exactly the native English speakers’ renderings instead of atypical ways. The learners need be provided with a steady supply of such samples through these book series so he/she would be as if in a virtual environment of native English speakers even if by reading only. Learning a language is best if you are in the environment of the native speakers of that certain language.

PATIKIM OR KICKSTART IN THIS FORUM BUT DISCUSSED AT LENGTH IN THE FIRST EDITION BOOK “HOW DO YOU SAY IT IN ENGLISH?, 2010 EDITION, ENHANCED” AND THE SECOND EDITION YET TO BE PUBLISHED ENTITLED “HOW DO YOU SAY IT IN ENGLISH?, NOSEBLEEDERS’ EDITION.”

Chapter 2, 2nd Edition

PATTERNS WHERE PINOYS USUALLY HAVE TROUBLE MAKING OUT LANGUAGE EQUIVALENTS

(Purchase your copy of the first edition ‘How do you say it in English?, 2010 Edition, Enhanced’ from National Book Store.) See first the indicators immediately below to understand the templates treated in the boxes next below.

FILIPINO SPECIMEN

COMMON PATTERNS WHERE PINOYS HAVE A HARD TIME OR IN BLUNDER FINDING TRANSLATIONS

STANDARD ENGLISH TRANSLATION

SPEAKING WAY OF THE NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH (FLUENT SOUNDING)

POOR PINOY TENDENCY

DONE BY THE NOVICE FILIPINO USER/SPEAKER OF ENGLISH; THOUGH GRAMMATICAL, YET NOT ENCOURAGED IN MOST CASES; SOMETIMES SOUND ACCEPTABLE ESPECIALLY IF THE STANDARD TRANSLATIONS ARE HARD TO AVAIL; AND SOMETIMES TOLERABLE OWING TO THE FACT OF THE PINOYS’ BEING NOT NATIVE SPEAKER OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE WHO THUS NEED BE PARDONED AND TOLERATED FOR SUCH DEFICIENCY OF THEIRS (GLIB/SIMPLISTIC SOUNDING)

Click each tab in each box below

 

 

 

 

 

Kapag naaalala ko ang unang beses ko makadalo, nararamdaman ko pa ang saya.

 

Recounting my first time to attend, I could still feel the excitement.

 

Dumating siya sa laban na ito, kung ano ang isang Mexican warrior.

 

 

He came to this fight, typical of a Mexican warrior.

 

He came to this fight, if what is a Mexican warrior.

 

Matapos bilhin ang TV set, iniregalo ito ni Mama sa tita ko.

 

Having bought the TV set, Mama made a gift of it to my aunt.

 

Inilagay niya ang mga kard ng maski papaano lang. Dapat sana inayos niya.

 

He placed the cards every which way. He should have put them in order.

 

He placed the cards if even how only. He should have put them in order.

Tingin ko, mga ilang oras din bago ito mawala.

 

I figure, it’s a matter of time before it goes out.

 

I think how many hours before it will go.

 

Back when I was in the schools, I have heard most students even teachers render in such a way as in Poor Pinoy Temdency as if asking a question. They are actually not in a state of asking question or not supposed to be asking a question.

Matapos niyang maluto ang karne, ipinamahagi niya na ito sa mahihirap.

 

 

Having cooked the meat, he then gave it away to the poor.

 

 

 

Sinabihan ako na hindi siya nakapanatili sa santwaryo sa kung anong mga dahilan na ayaw kong ipalagay.

 

I was told that he was unable to stay at the sanctuary for some reasons that I refuse to assume.

 

 

Lahat ng pinaggamitan mo ng sandata ay mapaparam.

 

Everything you used the weapon on will be wiped out.

 

 

 

Kaya ko na walang mali sa sinulat ko, kasi marami akong oras para i-edit.

 

I can make my write-up without error because I have the luxury of time to edit.

 

 

 

Pakawalan mo siya, ngayon din.

 

Release him, this instant.

 

 

 

Isipin lang ito ay mahirap at nakakapagod na.

 

Just the thought of it is so gruelling.

 

 

 

Incidental note: You notice that grueling is the translation for mahirap along with nakakapagod. Sometimes a single word in one language cannot be translated into another language in equally single word, rather, inevitably two or more words. See page 139 on Hold (makuha’t mapako) and page 130 on Give (sumuko’t kumilala) for another examples. (appropriate pages of the second edition)

Ngayon, oras na sa akin para maghigante.

 

Now, it’s time for me to get my revenge.

 

 

 

Nakakaumay na ang simple form Now it’s time for me to revenge.

Inihulog ito ng mga magnanakaw nang sinusubukan nilang tumakas.

 

The thieves dropped it when they were trying to make their escape.

 

Nakakaumay na ang simple form trying to escape without make alongside.

Sa panahon ngayon, ang teknolohiya ay kailangang-kailangan at bahagi na ng buhay.

 

In this day and age, technology is indispensable and a way of life.

 

 

 

Ang pagkilala sa mga insekto na mga diyos ay mali.

 

The regard of insects being gods is wrong.

 

 

 

Ang totoo niyan isang piso ang ibinayad ko.

 

It’s actually one peso that I paid.

 

 

 

Hindi natatakot ang taong ang panalangin ang sandigan./Hindi natatakot ang taong ang sandigan ay panalangin.

 

A man who has prayer as his recourse is not afraid.

 

 

 

Si Cristo ang pinaghahari niya sa buhay niya.

 

He has Christ rule over his life.

 

 

 

Alerto ang mga bata na may mataas na na antas ng dunong.

 

Alert are the children who have wisdom level already high.

 

 

 

Sabado ngayon. Mag-snack kaya tayo?!

 

It’s Saturday. How about we have some snacks?!

 

Gawin kaya natin ito?!

 

How about we do this?!

 

Pakialam ko.

 

Why do I bother?!

 

Pakahusayan mo.

 

Give it your best.

 

Hindi ito basta tindahan lang/basta tindahan. Marami kang masusumpungang libangan dito.

 

It is not just any store. You will find a lot of amusements here.

 

Ang pagtatamo ng lupain ay makakapagbigay sa iyo ng tulad ng seguridad na maibibigay ng pera.

 

Acquiring real estates will give you as much security as money can.

 

Akala ko, ang kinabibilangan mo ay kung anu-ano lang diyan na organisasyon.

 

I thought, what you belong in is just any organization.

 

Mag-aarkila ako ng ilang bidyo.

 

I’ll rent a couple of videos.

 

Magtataka ka; ninakaw ang tubo ng kung sinong magnanakaw na baka kapitbahay mo lang.

 

You will wonder; the pipe was stolen by some theft who could be just your neighbor.

 

You will wonder, the pipe was stolen of whoever theft who could be just your neighbor.

Obserbahan mo ang pating sa oceanarium. Mukhang aatake.

 

Observe the shark in the oceanarium. It is looking to attack.

 

You will wonder, the pipe was stolen of whoever theft who could be just your neighbor.

Nakita mo naman, mananalo ang Cavaliers. Ang scorecard ay 70-75 pabor sa Cavaliers at 40 seconds na lang ang nalalabi.

 

You see, the Cavaliers is looking to win. The scorecard is 70-75 in favor of Cavaliers and it is 40 seconds remaining.

 

You will think that the translation may be the Cavaliers will win; yes, puwede namang will ang gamitin. But then, masi-sense mo na ang tono ng nagsasalita sa Filipino ng mananalo ang Cavaliers bagaman walang word na mukhang ay nasa context o circumstance na kung saan sa tingin niya ay mukhang mananalo pa lang (sa pananaw niya) ang Cavaliers; hindi pa siya sigurado. Hence, the translation looking to win is just reasonable to use based on such context.

Dito sa ikalawang yugto, mukhang madudumina ng koponan ng Pilipinas ang koponan ng Russia.

 

Here in the second quarter, the Philippine team is looking to dominate the Russian team.

 

Kumuha ka ng libreng konsultasyon.

 

Avail yourself a free consultation.

 

 

Yourself — used for emphasis indicating exclusively the person that is being addressed

Isuko mo ang sarili mo.

 

Turn yourself in.

 

 

Magpakita ka.

 

Show yourself./Show yourself up.

 

 

Kumuha ka ng kahon na karton.

 

Get yourself a carton box.

 

 

Kumilos ka ng (kilos na) marapat sa isang maginoong lalaki.

 

Conduct yourself in a manner worthy of a gentleman.

 

 

This site is newly constructed. More articles are coming up.

 

Typical spots where there are translations blunders

The secret to the appropriate translation of Filipino specimens into English is by a combination of words that this book calls phrasal collocations (phrasal patterns), discouraging the word to word or direct pattern being the tendency or impulse of the beginners, who, in the process, end up rendering atypical translation instead.

PATIKIM OR KICKSTART IN THIS FORUM BUT DISCUSSED AND SAMPLED AT LENGTH IN THE FIRST BOOK AND THE SECOND BOOK YET TO BE PUBLISHED.

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER 1, 2nd Edition

Giving the usage of some English terms in relation to Filipino usage

With samples given as Specimen (Filipino) then Translation (English) called translation template as a set. Order your copy of the First Editon ‘How do you say it in English?’ from National Book Store.

 

 

Click  each tab in each box below.

 

 

 

In a condition or state of; expressing manner

When added with a certain noun, the preposition on with that noun becomes a prepositional phrase used as an adverb. A preposition can turn into adverb when used in combination with other words: on + noun — (becomes adverb as combined)

 

Sinadya ko ito. — I did it on purpose.

 

Sadya niyang inilabas ang isang manlalaro para hindi masira ang estratehiya. — He took out a player on purpose so as not to spoil the strategy.

 

Pinalago ko ito ng sadya. — I grew it on purpose.

 

At the expense of

Mag-Jollibee tayo, taya ako. — Let’s have a Jollibee time on me.

 

Si Beika ang bahala sa broadband na gagamitin. Ang mga load ninyo, huwag ninyong problemahin; akin iyan. — Beika will take charge of the broadband to be used. Regarding your loads, don’t concern yourselves; that will be on me.

 

About to overwhelm

When prefaced usually but not always with nearly, on becomes the equivalent to muntik-muntikan na of something that overwhelms another such as wave, opponent in a wrestling, falling object, falling tree, etc. In the Filipino format, how a thing is being muntik na doesn’t have to be specified.

 

 

Muntik-muntikan na sila ng kidlat. — The lightning was nearly on them.

 

Muntik ka ng punong bumuwal. The uprooted tree was on you.

 

So as to mingle

Inserted in the phrase/sentence to emphasize a mingling in the group or mass

 

Isabay mo na ang saging sa/(kasama ang) harina. — Mix the banana in with the flour.

 

Play in with us. — Makilaro ka sa amin./Sumabay ka maglaro sa amin.

 

 

So as to agree

 

 

Usually but not always with fall

 

Ang mga plano niya’y napaayon ng sa akin. — His plans fell in with mine.

 

Ang tagahatol ay nagpataw ng desisyon na paayon sa aming mga katuwiran. — The juror promulgated decision in our reasons.

 

 

This site is newly constructed. More articles are coming up.

 

Welcome to say it right in English!

Ano sa English ang “Inilagay niya sa mesa ang mga kard ng maski papaano lang. Hindi niya man lang inayos”? Pustahan sirit ka? Ano kaya iyang maski papaano lang? Heto pa, paano ba i-translate ang nakapatili at makapatulong? Ano ang pattern diyan sa nakapa at makapa?

The focal interest of this blog (later to be a new book, ‘How do you say it in English?, Nosebleeders’ Edition’) is to equate language to language translation patterns that are not treated in dictionaries and grammar books as well as not discussed in schools, such as those of these formats: naka-, nakapa-, makapa, nagka-, ipa-, napasa-, mapapa and similar other formats; as in nakatapilok, nakapatili, makapatulong, nagkaapoy, ipanalo, napasaakin, mapapadesisyon etc.

This book is not better than its first edition. Not even the first edition better than this. They are complementary to each other. This edition is simply a continuation of the former. It is assumed or advised that the user, as well as the mentor, guide, tutor, coach, or teacher of this book in series to his/her student, should have the basic familiarity of the prototype or first edition “How do you say it in English?” (2010 Edition, Enhanced) being published by National Book Store.

PROVISO

BOOK IN SERIES BASED ON AND COMPLEMENTARY TO THE PROTOTYPE “HOW DO YOU SAY IT IN ENGLISH?” (2010 EDITION, ENHANCED), PUBLISHED SINCE 2006. THIS BOOK SERIES WILL COME IN VARIOUS SETS OF TOPICS DESIGNATED AS AN EDITION PER SET, TO BEAR THE NOSEBLEEDER LOGO IN GENERAL AND TO BEAR A CALLOUT LOGO AT THE COVER FOR EACH EDITION WITH CORRESPONDING NUMBER (ACCORDING TO THE SEQUENCE IN SERIES) TO LABEL AND HIGHLIGHT SPECIAL TOPIC/S IN EACH INSTALMENT EDITION OF THE SERIES. ALL THESE SERIES/EDITIONS ARE DESIGNATED IN GENERAL AS HOW DO YOU SAY IT IN ENGLISH? SERIES. AUTHORED BY REMIGIO S. ESPARES III. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

CREDIT AND DISCLAIMER

ALL ENGLISH WORD MEANINGS AND DEFINITIONS USED IN THIS BOOK ARE QUOTED VERBATIM FOR REFERENCE BASIS FROM NEW LEXICON WEBSTER’S ENCYCLOPEDIC DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, 1990 (LEXICON PUBLICATIONS INC.), UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. EXPLANATIONS ARE PRINCIPALLY BASED UPON THE SAME MATERIAL BUT USED IN CONTEXT. APPLIED TRANSLATIONS, ILLUSTRATIONS, AND EXAMPLES ARE THE AUTHOR’S; ANY SIMILARITY, HOWEVER, IN THEIR FORMATS TO THOSE OF THE HEREIN CITED REFERENCE ARE MERELY INCIDENTAL, AND NECESSARY TO CONFORM TO GENERAL USAGE AND TO PRESERVE THE REFERENCE’S DENOTATIONS OF THE TERMS TREATED. THE AUTHOR ATTRIBUTES THE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OWNERSHIP AND ORIGINALITY OF THE CITATIONS TO LEXICON PUBLICATIONS INC. (PRINCIPALLY), ETC., AND ACKNOWLEDGES THAT THE CITATIONS ARE ONLY FOR INSTRUCTIONAL BACKUP IN THIS BOOK.

Get to Know First the Prototype First Edition

How do you say it in English? (2010 Edition, Enhanced)

Currently published by National Book Store (Philippines). A NEPP-RELEVANT BOOK PROMOTION (The National English Proficiency Program was established in response to the directive of President Gloria Arroyo to improve the English language proficiency of teachers in English, Mathematics and Science in the Department of Education.) In the author’s effort to help lighten the country’s problem of lack of mastery of the English language, and to contribute to the government’s National English Proficiency Program — We have produced a unique and practical reading material, which we believe would significantly contribute boost the confidence level of those in the academe using the English language. This reference material is first in Bicol and in the country. Originally prepared to help a friend, soon later, it helped a school; and now in a book and have been at bookstores to help the reading public. We are inspired to assert that our book is being published on public encouragement and demand! It is a wordbook of Filipino to English guide translations with discussions and instructions. Learners may use it in day-to-day practical conversation and writing—just when they have the idea right in their head, but can’t quite express the idea in straight English. The book is entitled “How do you say it in English?”

 

 

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Media Exposure

Featured in Marhay na Aga Kapamilya (Magandang Umaga Kapamilya) over ABS-CBN BICOL on March12, 2009.

University Use

Used by Bicol University Language Center (BULC) in Legazpi City, wih the center’s hundred copies order on February 18, 2009.

Handsome Sale

Turned out fetching sales in malls and bookstores in Bicol (Philippines) on its maiden releases.

Foreword

FIRSTLY, IT WAS THIS AUTHOR JUST LIKE ANY OTHER TYPICAL STUDENT, OFFICE WORKER OR PROFESSIONAL WHO FEARED TO SPEAK ENGLISH BECAUSE HE DID NOT KNOW HOW TO COMBINE PHRASES AND SENTENCES TO SOUND FLUENT. I WAS NOT A GOOD ENGLISH SPEAKER BACK THEN. EVEN THOUGH THROUGH SCHOOL I MADE GOOD GRADES IN ENGLISH SUBJECTS AND IN FACT EVEN BECAME AN EDITOR OF HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE ENGLISH PAPERS, YET THOSE CREDENTIALS DID NOT GUARANTEE FOR ME TO EARN THE IMPRESSION THAT I ALREADY WAS FLUENT AN ENGLISH SPEAKER. ADMITTEDLY I NEVER REALLY WAS. I WAS GOOD ONLY IN EDITING JUST LIKE MOST OTHER EDITORS, SINCE EDITING IS WRITTEN AND THAT EDITORS SIMPLY HAVE THE LUXURY OF TIME TO REVIEW THE MANUSCRIPT IN ORDER FOR IT TO FINALLY READ WONDERFULLY GRAMMATICAL. Mind you, but then, it is a reality that there may be many guys out there including or just like me back then who may be good grammarians and rich in dictionary-based vocabulary, yet still do nosebleed a lot of time. Mind you again, but then, mastery or expertise in grammar and dictionary-based vocabulary are just some bunch of things, whereas speaking straightly in the precise translation form is another or different point! Cross my heart, you cannot be an excellent grammarian and vocabulist who automatically is a straight and English who speak the language from childhood or have it as our day to day medium of conversation. In other words, we do not grow up or do not live in an environment where English is the common, typical, or native medium of communication. Then what has this condition something to do with our problem of deficiency in straightly speaking English despite our being infinitely taught with the grammar and vocabulary? Well, these two methods—1) the grammar learning and 2) the dictionary-based vocabulary enriching—which are our only two methods of English learning– cannot fully solve our problem. Because I declare: That still, there is no other best way of learning language than to be in the actual environment where that language is natively or innately spoken. But since we are not native English speakers, I suggest an alternative that unfortunately is missing in our system. Before I tell what this alternative is, let me reiterate that the two already existing methods are not sufficient. For the reason that the grammar learning in school is confined merely to the study of the base form. Base form method means concentrated only on the root. Then again, dictionary-based mastering of vocabulary is likewise base form. I will not explain much what I mean here by base form. You are please instead advised to read How do you say it in English? (2010 Edition, Enhanced) for the discussion on base form. I will rather illustrate some sample of the base form learning — Filipino Specimen: Inilagay niya ang mga kard sa mesa ng maski papaano lang. English Translation: (???) Our problem above is how to translate ng maski papaano lang in English which is quite hard. The grammar, for its part, cannot, of course, hint us the translation for ng maski papaano lang by treating the phrase in whole or as a unit particularly its grammatical components in relation to its equivalent in English. Now, if one’s grammar proficiency could not solve our translating dilemma, could the dictionary-based mastery yet solve the problem? We have seen that it’s absolutely no! So mangangapa tayo and our tendency of translation would be: “He placed the cards on the table by even how only.” Kakatawa ano! E kasi naman wala tayong kinagisnan na references o sources of pattern na itinuturo o inirerekomenda sa school mula pa umapak ang mga paa natin sa eskwelahan! The above would be the ridiculous tendency of translation if we obey the dictionary-based method UNLESS WE NOW START LOOKING FOR SOME MORE REFERENCE FOR TRANSLATION PATTERNS aside from grammar checking and dictionary checking. Now, let me tell, that here is the THIRD METHOD THAT HAD BEEN MISSING IN OUR SYSTEM—the method applied and treated in this book of mine. Correct translation for the preceding question: He placed the cards on the table every which way. I believe it’s high time more such samples of correct translation should be constantly provided to help the nosebleeders. I will do the honor thru this book series. Back to the topic on the birth of this book series: Finding a solution to overcome my translating deficiency back then, just as those of most Filipinos, I explored the juxtaposition and paradigm (see the appropriate page in this site) of translations. Coming up with a coherent paradigm of proper translation or translating, I wrote my first sample manuscripts on some old used notebooks. I then decided to make homemade prints and as a test market distributed some 50 copies for free to my friends—students, professionals, brilliant students, not so brilliant ones, young, old, and of different other sorts. Almost all of them reacted positively, even wanting to buy copies. Encouraged by their feedback, I put up not so big a fund to have the first machine printouts of 500 copies in 2007. I sold the copies via some bookstores and malls in Bicol. With D’Third Editorials Co., a publishing partnership I organized with three partners, the book was put into legal circulation, earning the very warm welcome of the reading public. The initial commercially produced copies had been sold out, so reprints were necessary to supply the patronizing public. Then on February 19, 2009, the book was adapted for reference use by Bicol University Language Center in Legazpi city with the university’s hundred copies order. What’s more, on March 12, 2009, the book was featured over ABS-CBN (Bicol) on its morning show “Marhay na Aga Kapamilya” (Magandang Umaga Kapamilya). These accomplishments prompted me to prepare a business proposal with the country’s biggest book retailer (National Book Store) that readily accepted the book and is currently publishing since 2010 the revised first edition, “How do you say it in English? (2010 Edition, Enhanced)”. Where the book and its series currently see print up to this day, it’s all owing to the painstakingly studied trial market of a business attempt of book selling that was, though worrying, yet turned out achievable. In fact the test market was the hardest part than writing the book itself. Because when you publish a book, you will have to tune up to the nuances and modes of the readers, incorporating their complexion to the style of your writing. So you will consider revising every so often. Thanks to my marketing assistants who supplied me with enlightening insights realized from their actual encounters in their previous bookselling stints even before we got to know each other. The test market was exciting indeed as my marketing assistants and I were selling copies in the side streets. The encouraging thing was that most people to whom we offered the book for sale reacted positively. They were right away convinced that we really are in vital need of patterns for translation and that this book is the answer and thus very timely. As far as those few we encountered to refuse and criticize us negatively at first, our proposal was: “Okay sir/maam, if you are not convinced now, here, please allow us to just leave the copy with you for three days. Go over it. When we come back and you are not convinced, then return to us the book without a due.” Interestingly, as soon as we went back to get the book, the customer would not give the copy back but paid for it instead.

 

 

 

 

 

What is “How do you say it in English?”?

HOW DO YOU SAY IT IN ENGLISH? IS A PARADIGM; THE MUCH-NEEDED PARADIGM FOR THE PROPER TRANSLATING TO ENGLISH OF MOST FILIPINO SPECIMENS WHOSE EQUIVALENT RENDITIONS IN ENGLISH ARE HARD TO FIND IN DICTIONARIES AND HARDLY LEARNABLE OR ALMOST UNLEARNABLE IN SCHOOLS. THOUGH TEACHING OF ENGLISH IN SCHOOLS IS INFINITE, IT’S IRONICAL THAT THE PROCESS STILL CANNOT MAKE MOST FILIPINOS FLUENT, RATHER, ONLY A FEW CAN SPEAK THE LANGUAGE STRAIGHTLY. THE PROBLEM REALLY IS BECAUSE WE DON’T HAVE THE APPROPRIATE PARADIGM TO ADDRESS THE PROBLEM. Why is the problem so? The reason as revealed in this book is that we don’t have the paradigm, which, luckily as far as I humbly declare, this book now provides at long last along with the recommended solution. As a solution in general. There are three ways to apply so that one will be able to speak English straightly. The first two is already and typically applied or have been in permanently in our academic system. They are as follows: 1) the grammar study as well as mastery and, 2) dictionary mastery or vocabulary enrichment. The problem is that our academic system focuses only on these two. So that despite the fact that we are the third largest English speaker in the world, still most of us end up nosebleeding. The missing link to the method is this suggested by this book which should be the third method—the translation paradigm. In order to come up with the nearest or appropriate translation or the paradigm for such, I used the process of the juxtaposition of the hardest to translate Filipino specimens with their nearest English translations. Literally, juxtaposition is a physical placing of things side by side. Theoretically in this book, however, I involved the process of studying, analysing, determining, and finding the logical resemblances in the meaning of the two languages in question by the contexts in which they are spoken or used in some given settings in order to arrive at their nearest or appropriate vice versa translations. Logic and context are the two important elements used in this attempt or study of translation paradigm. To understand why and how logic and context are involved in the process, see the explanations and illustrations on page 233, Final Points (in the book as soon as it gets published, but see the appropriate page herein). “How Do You Say it in English Series” is not a dictionary though technically anyway, this book looks like a dictionary. Because the typical dictionaries chiefly concern on the treatment of meanings of base-form core words, unlike this book that treats the extensive considerations. See the prototype (first of the series) “How do you say it in English?” (2010 Edition, Enhanced) for the comprehensive explanations. Also, it is not a rule book because there is no rule in translating. It is not even a grammar book though incidentally some grammar matters are treated here. Rather, it is a “paradigm”. Paradigm means an example serving as a pattern (New Lexicon Webster’s Encyclopedic Dictionary of the English Language, 1990); a model or pattern for something that may be copied; a theory or a group of ideas about how something should be done, made, or thought about; example, pattern, especially an outstandingly clear or typical example or archetype (emphasis supplied by this author). And late Latin paradigma, from Greek paradeigma, from paradeiknynai (to show side by side), from para- + deiknynai (to show) … (Merriam-Webster, Encyclopaedia Britannica Company). Why is this book a paradigm? For the simple reason that since we cannot make a rule in translation, so then the best option is to make the paradigm (the archetype or prime example pattern of how something should be done, made; or thought about especially or outstandingly clear). Because if nobody will initiate just as this author has been doing, we will simply end up constantly inventing our Atypical Translation. Atypical means uncharacteristic, nonconforming, different, unusual, not customary, not standard, uncommon, strange, out of the usual run, and odd. Thus, without the standard paradigm but instead merely loose freedom to apply atypical mode of translating, more trouble will be entailed that will lead one to the loss of confidence in speaking, more so, doubt in oneself when he/she is compelled by situation to be engaged to speak or write. Since juxtaposition is the placing side by side, it is but logical to use this process to arrive at the paradigm, since anyway, paradigm (Greek paradeigma—showing side by side) is the ultimate showing or presentation—the ultimate model.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why this nosebleeders’ edition?

KASI NAMAN, APAT NA MALING AKALA ANG INIISIP MO KUNG BAKIT HINDI KA MAKAPAG-ENGLISH NG DIRETSO: 1) SABI MO ITINUTURO NAMAN ANG GRAMMAR SA SCHOOL AT MATAAS PA NGA ANG GRADE MO AT ANG DAMI MO PANG SAULADONG VOCABULARY,2) ITINATANONG MO KUNG ANO BA ANG RULE SA PAG-TRANSLATE, 3) NAGTATAKA AT NAGUGULUHAN KA KUNG BAKIT PAG TRINANSLATE MO ANG BAWAT SYNTAX, MORPHEME AT COLLOCATION NG FILIPINO AY PANGIT ANG KINALALABASAN AT HINDI MO MAINTINDIHAN KUNG ANO BA TALAGA ANG PROBLEMA, E HONOR STUDENT KA PA NAMAN, 4) NAITATANONG MO KUNG SAAN BA MAHAHAGILAP ANG SOURCES O REFERENCES KUNG PAANO MAKAPAG-TRANSLATE NG TAMA? Not only you do nosebleed in translating or speaking English; you likewise do nosebleed in thinking out why and how. The clarifications to all these blunders of yours are already expounded in the relevant pages in this blog forum. Let’s admit it out to one another—one’s being an excellent student, valedictorian, cum laude, and academic awardee at that, does not guarantee one’s necessarily being fluent in English. Not even one’s being grammar proficient; because grammar is simply the study of the systematic rules of a language or the system of forms and syntactical usages characteristic of any language. Hence, take note, grammar is not the study of the equivalence of two languages in relation to each other. Please take note of my emphasis: Grammar learning is unlike the Paradigm treated by this book which concerns on the logical equating of two languages or evaluating them in relation to each other. Not even the fact of having a bulk of memorized vocabulary from the dictionary can guarantee for one to be fluent in English; because dictionary vocabulary learning concerns primarily on the singular base form treatment of each word, not on the collocational form of words in relation to translation. On the contrary, what concerns the proper translating is the collective treatment of words as they are used in a contextual application. You can master translation only by context along with logic. This is the idea of the process of juxtaposition. Context pertains to the conditions or circumstances which affect something. Hence, translating by context is, contrary to direct or word to word translating, that which take into consideration the background or setting in which words are treated. Please see page 233, Final Points (in the book when it gets published but may be reviewed in appropriate page herein) on explanations on translating from context with logic. Let me have this one more emphasis: Translation should be context-sensitive; meaning, in a translating behavior that depends on a given setting or situation; hindi ‘yung direkta kaagad-agad! Hence, we truly need some PARADIGM FOR TRANSLATING as well as a wide-ranging work (but not extremely wide) about it where samples are given with discussions or treatments. Such is the idea that this book serves and sets as a learning norm. This book itself is the paradigm. This paradigm is the THIRD METHOD that I would like to incorporate in our study of the English language. The two—the grammar learning and the dictionary-based vocabulary enriching—had long been in place in our academe. Let’s add my method then. It’s simple and basic anyway. Matrabaho nga lang sa case ko kasi ako ang research ng research at juxtapose ng juxtapose! All the three methods should go hand in hand to complete our learning process. But then wait … I believe that a single edition of such book as this one is not sufficient. Instead, samples should be provided continuously on in such a way that, with the user/learner’s constant updating or getting updated with samples thru the series of editions, it would go as if he gets himself adapted to the English language as if it were his/her day-to-day tongue. That way, our problem—the problem posed in the preceding pages—that we are not used to the language from childhood and that it is not our day-to-day medium, being the reason why we are not straight English speakers since we are not steeped to it, will then be finally addressed or solved. But then, since you could hardly look for somebody else around you who could be native English speaker or master translator in order for you to interact with, so as to constantly get yourself used to as well as steep in the language, then have instead yourself this book series. Kailangan, may tulad nito na makasanayan ng Pinoy.